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Event Handler Testing

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This document provides a quick example of how to write tests for your event handlers. You should be familiar with TestSpecs before diving into this topic.

Prerequisites#

The package is shipped as a separate module. It is available via maven as com.facebook.litho:litho-testing. To include it in your gradle build, add this line to your dependencies block:

testImplementation 'com.facebook.litho:litho-testing:0.40.0'

What to test for#

We are going to work with this spec in our example:

@LayoutSpec
public class LearningStateComponentSpec {
@PropDefault static final boolean canClick = true;
@OnCreateInitialState
static void onCreateInitialState(
ComponentContext c,
StateValue<Integer> count) {
count.set(0);
}
@OnCreateLayout
static Component onCreateLayout(
ComponentContext c,
@Prop(optional = true) boolean canClick,
@State Integer count) {
return Text.create(c)
.text("Clicked " + count + " times.")
.textSizeDip(50)
.clickHandler(canClick ? LearningStateComponent.onClick(c) : null)
.backgroundRes(android.R.color.holo_blue_light)
.alignSelf(STRETCH)
.paddingDip(BOTTOM, 20)
.paddingDip(TOP, 40)
.build();
}
@OnUpdateState
static void incrementClickCount(StateValue<Integer> count) {
count.set(count.get() + 1);
}
@OnEvent(ClickEvent.class)
static void onClick(ComponentContext c) {
LearningStateComponent.incrementClickCount(c);
}
}

When testing event handlers, it is important to remember what you actually want to validate in your unit test. You may be getting this inkling to ensure that a click event you issue triggers the callback you pass in as your prop. When you do this, you are actually testing the framework. This is not what you want to spend your time on. While writing high-level end-to-end tests ensuring that your touch events have the right effects, this is not what you should concern yourself with for unit tests.

Testing handler presence#

Instead, let's focus on the actual logic that we have in our spec. Whether or not we have a click handler depends on the prop canClick. It is very common for handlers to be set conditionally based on a prop. In our test, we are going to limit ourselves to checking if a handler is set or not. For that we can use the TestSpec matchers we have learned about before.

@RunWith(LithoTestRunner.class)
public class LearningStateComponentSpecTest {
@Rule public ComponentsRule mComponentsRule = new ComponentsRule();
@Test
public void testComponentOnClick() {
final ComponentContext c = mComponentsRule.getContext();
final Component component = LearningStateComponent.create(
c)
.canClick(true)
.build();
LithoAssertions.assertThat(c, component).has(
SubComponentExtractor.subComponentWith(
c,
TestText.matcher(c)
.clickHandler(IsNull.<EventHandler<ClickEvent>>notNullValue(null)).build())
);
}
@Test
public void testNoComponentOnClick() {
final ComponentContext c = mComponentsRule.getContext();
final Component component = LearningStateComponent.create(
c)
.canClick(false)
.build();
LithoAssertions.assertThat(c, component).has(
SubComponentExtractor.subComponentWith(
c,
TestText.matcher(c)
.clickHandler(IsNull.<EventHandler<ClickEvent>>nullValue(null)).build())
);
}
}

As you can see here, we can match against a click handler just like any other prop set on a sub-component. Matching against a specific instance of an EventHandler is currently not supported.

Next#

Either head back to the testing overview or continue with the next section, Espresso.